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quinnedwards

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Reply with quote  #16 
3.1 When I worked as a camp counselor children would miss their parents and act out. They would also feel disconnected if they felt sick or had a minor injury like a bee sting. Furthermore, if children where hungry or disinterested in the structured activity they would feel disconnected. 

3.2 Infants will typically cry to signal that they need help. Toddlers may throw a tandrum. It's more appropriate to expect older children will verbalize their needs, while younger kids to not have that ability. 

3.3 The "listen limit listen" model provides instruction in how care providers can initately ask a child what is wrong, limit harmful behavior, and listen to the child again after they have calmed down and want to talk. I think the hardest component of these steps would be remaining calm and patient while the child is most emotionally-elevated

3.4 I have always had the help i needed when dealing with a difficult tandrum. When my little sister would have tantrums in my care we would take breaks from each other so we could cool down. In the context of a preschool, I would just ask for help if I started to feel overwhelmed. 
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mabowen

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Reply with quote  #17 
3.1
A child may feel lonely and be missing mom/dad. They also might feel tired or ill which will cause them to feel disconnected.
3.2
Children will cry or yell. Sometimes they will even use the word help.
3.3
It can be hard to listen on the last step because our natural instinct is to stop kids from crying.
3.4
I don't believe I have ever found myself possibly harming a child, but the times where I feel inpatient I remind myself to take a breath and it's going to be okay. I also ask a co-worker for help.


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jvillanueva

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Reply with quote  #18 

3.1

To much negative reinforcement- it causes them to clam up sometimes. That or their parents interjecting over them multiple times in a row, not allowing them to speak.

3.2
Hitting, biting, or hiding under a table, causing difficulties in class, taking revenge or trying to get attention.

3.3
-Listen: To the problem and the child
-Limit: Try to limit the damage on the child or harm to others if need be.
-Listen: To the child's explanation.
Probably the Limiting part. Every child is different and what works for one may not work for another. It's just something you have to learn on a case by case basis.

3.4
Remind myself that they are a child and every one deserves respect. We're adults, we should handle ourselves as such and not act like children and last out.
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LeahKerr

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Reply with quote  #19 
3.1 A thing that made a child feel disconnected was when another child didn't allow them to play with their friends and ran off, leaving that child alone on the playground. 

3.2 Children usually come to you crying or yelling to you, waving their arms or showing you that they are stressed and need assistance with a problem. 

3.3 Limit is probably the most hard for me to handle because some kids will not want to "take a break" and will not listen when you ask them to go "take a break". 

3.4 I asked another teacher to come help me so that I can deal with the child calmly and have a second teacher watching and stepping in if needed. 
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Olyvia.hayter

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Reply with quote  #20 
Discussions 3: Stimulate your thinking.

3.1. What are some things, large or small, that you have seen that caused a child to feel disconnected?

Things like moving to a new school, moving houses, or having a new sibling can cause qa child to feel disconnected.

3.2. How do children signal that they need help?

By showing off-track behavior like biting, hitting, and not following direction.

3.3. Describe the Listen, Limit, Listen process. Which step is toughest for you?

Listen to the problem and the child
Try to limit the damage on the child or harm to others
Listen to the child's explanation

Listening to the explanation is probably the hardest for me.

3.4. How have you stopped yourself or gotten help when you felt you might harm a child?

I will always ask for help from another teacher if I am starting to feel frustrated.
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rjfranklin23

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Reply with quote  #21 
3.1. A child can feel disconnected when an activity goes on too long, the situation is either too easy or too challenging for the child, the parents are too involved, the child feels under the weather or having an off-day (hungry, tired etc).

3.2. Children signal they need help with they act out by throwing toys, pushing other children, biting, to name a few.

3.3. Listen: Figure out what's going on
Limit: Problem-solve the situation
Listen: Make space for the reaction
Limiting is the hardest step because you want to have children to come up with limits on their own, but they may not have the knowledge or vocabulary to do so yet (esp when frustrated)

3.4. Step back from the situation and realize that the children are feeling frustrated/stress and the situation may be better solved getting assistance from another teacher.
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devfreim

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Reply with quote  #22 
3.1) Believing that they were treated unfairly by an adult or a friend. If they make an important request of an adult and they feel that their request has not been taken seriously.

3.2) Often with crying or screaming, but also with body language and behavior towards others (like a change in typical classroom behavior).

3.3) Listen to the child's perspective on the situation, limit the disruptive or unsafe actions engaged in by that child, listen to the child's reaction to your limitation and be there for the child. The hardest part for me is the second listen. The child may feel as though they are being treated unfairly and it is difficult to feel like that bad guy sometimes. 

3.4) Being mindful that they are children and are not fully in control of their actions is the most helpful strategy for me. They are not trying to make your life difficult, they are reacting to the situation in the only way they know how with very few tools at their disposal, it is not personal.
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melverston

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Reply with quote  #23 
Discussions 3: Stimulate your thinking.
3.1. What are some things, large or small, that you have seen that caused a child to feel disconnected?
I often feel disconnected from my students after we have a disagreement or I have to remind them to either listen to directions or be respectful of their classmates, teachers, or environment. While these are necessary parts of being a teacher and maintaining a safe environment for your class they can be proven to be tricky in many ways.

3.2. How do children signal that they need help?
Children let you know when they need help by either telling you or showing strong emotions while working on their projects.

3.3. Describe the Listen, Limit, Listen process. Which step is toughest for you?
Listen to the scenario
Limit the reaction
Listen to the student again
The hardest part for me is to start with listening instead of limiting first.

3.4. How have you stopped yourself or gotten help when you felt you might harm a child?
I have never felt like harming a child but if I did I would immediately contact my director and take the remainder of the day off.
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shannonsandberg4

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Posts: 51
Reply with quote  #24 

3.1. What are some things, large or small, that you have seen that caused a child to feel disconnected?

Kids can feel disconnected if they don't feel listened to. 

3.2. How do children signal that they need help?

Usually with off track behavior 

3.3. Describe the Listen, Limit, Listen process. Which step is toughest for you?

Listen: hear the child's needs
Limit: potential harm 
Listen: keep listening 

Listening can be hard if there are distractions

3.4. How have you stopped yourself or gotten help when you felt you might harm a child?


If you are ever really frustrated, it's always worth having someone else handle a child.

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SelenaGreen86

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Reply with quote  #25 
3.1
Children feel disconnected if they have been scolded, especially in front of their peers.

3.2
A child will usually signal that they need help by being overly emotional and having a form of an outburst.

3.3
Listen: hearing what the child is trying to communicate with an open mind
Limit: keep the child from harming them selves or others
Listen: Remaining present for the child while they release pent up emotion after expressing themselves to you.

I would say the last Listen step would be most difficult for me. I would think that it would be hard after you as an adult may feel the situation has had enough time, but yet the child is still upset. It can be hard to stop and realize that they are still trying to handle their emotions.

3.4
If I have ever been frustrated with a child, I have had another teacher deal with that student so i may let go of my own frustration before I lose my patience with that child.
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annasophia

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Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #26 
3.1 Children feel disconnected when they feel excluded or different than their peers.

3.2 Children sometimes signal that they need help by acting out or by removing themselves from the group.

3.3 Listen to what the child is saying, limit potential danger or harm, listen to the child again. The hardest part for me sometimes is listening at the beginning before any harm has been dealt with, especially if there is someone else hurt or upset.

3.4 When I'm getting frustrated with a child to a point that feels overwhelming I walk away and ask another teacher for their advice and/or help.
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blooms

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Posts: 47
Reply with quote  #27 
3.1 Children feel disconnected when they feel excluded, embarrassed, or do not understand how to do something.

3.2 Sometimes a child's cry for help comes out in tantrums, hitting, biting or even tears.

3.3 Listen to why the child is doing what they are doing, limit the harmful behavior and listen again to any frustrations that the child may have. The hard part sometimes is catching the child before anyone gets their feelings hurt to listen.

3.4 I have never been in a position where I thought I would hurt a child.
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