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MKazimer

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Reply with quote  #1 
Discussion 3.1: How would you approach a parent or caregiver about the need for a referral for developmental screening of their child? What do you need to consider before talking to a parent or caregiver?

Before talking to a parent or caregiver it is important to have observable and objective documentation of the child's development and growth. It is also important to have resources available for the family to connect with so that you are supporting their efforts to provide the appropriate interventions. It is also to keep this information confidential and shared only with the professionals who are involved.
Once these components are taken care of I would approach the parent or caregiver during our regular pick up time and would ask if they had a time they would like to set up a meeting or phone conference at their convenience.
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kennedyanson

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2.1 You can use the documentation or anecdotal approach, where you write down a brief account of what happened and why it is important.

2.2 It is important to observe what information is gained and it is valuable because it helps keep track of the children's development and milestones they reached.


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jodiehkm

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Reply with quote  #3 
I would approach a parent politely and calmly, scripting my discussion with a co-worker beforehand. I will also make sure I have my facts right regarding being objective instead of being subjective. Therefore, parents can know that it is the truth and it is not a judgement. I would then make sure they get the appropriate help from the right people.
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MariaGravena

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Reply with quote  #4 
First I would make sure I have all the documentation, observations and supportive resources to show them what is atypical on their child development stage. Then I would approach the parents in a gentle and respectful way, explain to them what the red flags are and what we can do as a caregivers to make sure the child can develop in all domains
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jvillanueva

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Reply with quote  #5 
Before I approach a parent or caregiver about their child, I would want to make sure that I have as much documentation, observation, and evidence as I can have on the atypical development. I would ensure that I am prepared with a list of resources before I refer them to one. I would start by letting them know of my observations, ask if this is something that occurs in the home or something they have noticed before and reassure them that all observations and referrals are confidential. Then I would hand them the list of resources and recommend a certain place that I know will be able to serve them best. 

One important thing to consider before approaching a parent or caregiver is to know basic information about their lives. Is their child an only child? Usually parents are more protective and defensive over their first and only child. They're more nervous and prone to worry over little things. It is important to reassure them before jumping in with a list of things that may be wrong with their child.

It is also important to script the discussion with a co-worker before approaching the parent/caregiver. It helps to have an outside point of view that can also give you pointers on how to make your approach effective and more supportive. 
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shannonsandberg4

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Reply with quote  #6 
Before talking to a parent, I would make sure my decision is clear and unbiased to talk to the parents. I would also confer with coteachers to make sure were were on the same page. Then, I would bring up the conversation lightly, because most likely the parents have felt the same worries as you. I would wait a while and give options to the parents and then just get a screening hopefully for good measure.
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melverston

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Reply with quote  #7 
I believe when having a professional conversation with a parent it is always a good idea to first think about that you might say. Then ask yourself if that is the correct way to provide that information, am I showing opinion or judgement? After I answer all of these questions and have revised what I will say I then choose to run it by a coworker to make sure I didn't miss any opinions or judgement in my message. It is important to be professional and clear when providing important information about a child's individual development.
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peteintro71

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Reply with quote  #8 
Discussion 3.1: How would you approach a parent or caregiver about the need for a referral to developmental screening of their child? What do you need to consider before talking to a parent of caregiver?

I would first consider conversations like this can be difficult, but we are required by law to advise the family of their child’s progress and issues relating to their developmental needs. But with that same understanding be mindful that these conversations can be painful to discuss, or even be intimidating. As teachers we must take great care and be thoughtful in how the conversation unfolds with the family.

Working out a script or outline of how you’d like the conversation to flow is helpful.
Have documentation at hand to refer to.
Be objective in your discussion. Base things on evidence, not opinion.
Have a list of local referral resources available so the family will have the needed information to make the next steps toward extra support and care that may be needed.

Also keep in mind that this information, and any referrals made on behalf of the child need to be kept confidential and shared only with the child’s caregivers and the professionals directly involved.
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kpayo418

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Reply with quote  #9 
I would first discuss it with my lead teacher or any other teachers who know the child. Then I would on=bserve and record these behaviors. Then when the time came, I would first gauge the parents situation (what is going on in their lives that would affect their response) then wait until they were alone in the room (no other parents) and pick the appropriate topic to start.. Then the compliment sandwich, positive behavior, red flag, positive behavior of their child. And definitely be ready for questions of how they can help and how you can help.
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srambow

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Reply with quote  #10 
I would first make sure I had all my data/observations. I would present to my director or co-teachers and then from there I would ask parents to come in for a sit down meeting. I would share my observations objectively with them while keeping in mind their sensitivity on the subject of their child. I would provide them with local resources to connect with along with any additional information that would help.
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annasophia

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Reply with quote  #11 
I would talk out the situation with my director or another teacher before approaching the family. When approaching the family I would do my best to use only objective information when describing the events that occurred to lead me to recommending a screening, and I would be prepared with local resources for them to use. Before talking to a parent or caregiver its important to consider that these conversations aren't easy, and that the best way to talk to them about it is by giving only facts and not bringing assumption or sibjective details into the observation. 
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blooms

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Reply with quote  #12 
I would make notes and use observation tools before bringing this to my director. I would then have a meeting with the director ad parents explaining what led me to believe the meeting and a screening was necessary. I would come prepared with local resources ready and make sure the line of communication stayed open for the parents to feel supported.
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