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VirginiaMcAlister

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Posts: 12
Reply with quote  #1 
My family is unusual in that in includes only my sister and I. She lives in the southern part of the US, and I live in Washington. Neither of us have secondary families of our own. Our mother passed away 2 years ago, and we don't have contact with our father. Both of these factors definitely influence our relationships with friends and other loved ones, just as our mother's illness and our father's addiction influenced our relationships and school performance when we were children. When I imagine an immigrant family, I think of a big, extended family, with grandparents and lots of children. I imagine their clothing to perhaps be specific to the country of origin, and I imagine them to have limited or no English. I think about all of the adults helping to care for the children in the family, and everyone pitching in to help within the household.
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allison85beau

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Reply with quote  #2 
In direct response to the user above, my family is my sister and I, as well as our husbands (we don't have kids). Our family has sadly shrunk over to years due to cutting out toxic family members, and although it was extremely hard at first, we are much happier now that we don't have negative enforcement on a daily basis. We've learned that we want to be happy and to surround ourselves with people that make us happy. So we have a small family, but we are lucky because both me and my sister have in-laws that are very loving and supportive.

Because of the turmoil and the migrant crisis that is currently affecting Europe, I think of the families from Syria that are facing incredible turmoil. I wish that the US would step in and help, I feel like we have lots of room here. Migrant families tend to be rather large, as in middle Eastern cultures, extended family is the same thing as the immediate family. In my own family, we were never very close to our cousins, but in Islamic families, they marry their cousins in order to strengthen their family ties. So in my image of a migrant family, I'm thinking of people that have already been through unimaginable horrors of war and perhaps already losing many family members.
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laney1097

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Reply with quote  #3 
My family is my mom, brother and I. We all live in Washington state. We are super close. My mom is ill. so i take care of her while going to college and working. It is stressful having to do all three, and paying bills I'm constantly always out of money. I was taught not talk about my family issues so im just gonna leave it at that. 

For, me I imagine them to have some or no English.I think that everyone is helping out trying to provide for the family. And if the kids are in school they are getting help and support from their teachers. 
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annasophia

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Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #4 
Recently my family has changed, as I now live in my own space with my partner and a new baby boy. I feel extremely lucky to have brought my baby into a world where we are rich with family. We have lots of family near us from all different sides of both families, and while this baby has challenged me to become vastly more independent, I am grateful to have such tight knit family whether they are in Washington, or other parts of the country. 

When I picture an immigrant family, I imagine they are a large one that is close to all extended family members like mine. I imagine their children to have the love and care of many adults other than their parents, and while they may speak English throughout the day in public, the child is strongly bilingual and speaks their native language at home with their family. I also imagine that the family has strong ties to their native culture, and that the family practices their cultures religion, continues to make their cultures food, celebrates their holidays, etc.
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srambow

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Reply with quote  #5 
I am a single mother. My family is my 2 year old and myself. Her father is in the picture every other weekend and once a week dinners. We do once a week dinners together with her. My family lives in the same town and is my child's childcare 5 days a week. Her fathers side never see's her and never helps out with childcare (They lives 25 miles away). I feel extremely grateful and lucky to have my family be such a huge part of my daughters life and mine. We are a very close family. I sometimes get depressed thinking about the other side of my daughters family and how they are not involved and do not reach out to be more active. 

When i picture an immigrant family I imagine a very strong sense of love and respect for themselves and others. I picture multi generations under one roof sharing in responsibilities around the home. I also picture the children needing extra help in school if their is a language barrier. I also envision these people having to deal with racial profiling/threats due to this countries political climate/blatant racism. 

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Sara Rambow
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ysaki

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #6 
I recently made new family which is my husband and I. Before that, I lived with my immigrant aunt and uncle from my own country. My mother is still in my own country and she is also immigrated from other country so I have lived in three countries including U.S. Even my family members are separated, we are strongly bonds with each others. Because of my background, I can understand diverse culture in my workplace, and I am thankful for that.  
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globalnomads2003

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Reply with quote  #7 
My family is my Caucasian husband, I am an Asian immigrant and we have two bi-racial children. We lived in my country for a few years and is now in the US. I still have my parents and siblings in Asia and my husband's parents are in the US. Despite the separation we are all close to my family in my home country and even my in-laws.  My children were exposed to both cultures equally although we are now approaching more years living in the US but they haven't forgotten their time in my home country and the friends they had. Culture is important for the development of a child and in making them open minded to a lot of things.  I notice that they are not averse in trying out new food and enjoy other cuisines other than our own, a new language (they are learning Spanish), they love travelling, they are not shy in welcoming new kids in the school because they were once in that situation, their friends are a diverse lot of different cultures as well. Exposing them to a lot of cultural stimulation opens the world to them and make them curious about the other peoples and cultures that they meet along the way.
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