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lsharman

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Reply with quote  #1 
I read the books Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio and The Peace Book by Todd Parr. The Peace Book is all about the different things that is peace is. The children love to guess what each is going to be, and when I have heard them read it to each other before they are readers, they do literal interpretations of the pictures as the message. We talk a lot about peace in our classroom and I think this book helps them understand that it is not a big or complicated concept, it happens in quiet times and places and in very ordinary situations. The story is about being the perfect fit for your family, no matter what you look like or what the world might think. This is a great way to introduce being unique and enjoy and celebrating that uniqueness. Not all of the children are able to have a conversation about the themes in the book, but the older children were able to talk about feeling proud of who you are and being the perfect fit for your family.
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lalaroper

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Reply with quote  #2 

I read a "More More More" by Vera B Williams and "The Crayon Box that Talked" by Shane Derolf. 
"More More More", though not one of my favorite books, was interesting for the children because they had a lot of questions, especially about the names of the children. I explained that everyone has different knicknames and ways their family shows love to them. They loved the pictures and the joy you could see on the children in the books faces. 
In "the crayon box that talked" we read it a couple times. When we talked about how the crayons were saying unkind things about the other colors they knew that that was not a great choice or kind words to be saying and they didn't like that part so much. Later when the crayons realize each others worth they always start smiling and celebrating that the crayons made a "thumbs up" choice. 
These two books are simple ways that we can teach the children that no matter what "color" or what your family calls you or how different we are, thats ok! Often I think we feel these topics are too heavy or that these young children won't understand them when in fact if we expose children to these ideas and help them understand that everyone is different, they are far more receptive than we initially think. 

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KIrish

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Reply with quote  #3 
I read "A fly went by" By Dr Seuss and "When you give a Moose a Muffin". I enjoyed reading "A fly went by" as it showed how we stereotype, in this case animals and I feel like we sometimes tend to do that with people too. Instead of thinking the worst about people we should take a minute and see and hear from their perspective.
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VirginiaMcAlister

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lsharman
I read the books Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio and The Peace Book by Todd Parr. The Peace Book is all about the different things that is peace is. The children love to guess what each is going to be, and when I have heard them read it to each other before they are readers, they do literal interpretations of the pictures as the message. We talk a lot about peace in our classroom and I think this book helps them understand that it is not a big or complicated concept, it happens in quiet times and places and in very ordinary situations. The story is about being the perfect fit for your family, no matter what you look like or what the world might think. This is a great way to introduce being unique and enjoy and celebrating that uniqueness. Not all of the children are able to have a conversation about the themes in the book, but the older children were able to talk about feeling proud of who you are and being the perfect fit for your family.
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VirginiaMcAlister

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Reply with quote  #5 
I like how the children in your class are doing interpretations of the pictures as the message! I'm not familiar with this book, but it sounds like something the kids really enjoy.
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blooms

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Reply with quote  #6 
I read the book Chrysanthemum to my children. We discussed that uniqueness and being different is a great thing. Our world would be very boring without diversity. I want to instill in the children of this generation the importance of embracing diversity- both in themselves and in others.
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