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lmclellan1988

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Reply with quote  #46 
I find that the best way to make the families feel supported is simply to communicate with them. Getting to know them and allowing them to feel comfortable talking to you will encourage them to open up and share with us about their child. I find that at drop off or pick up just sharing a little story with them about their child lets them know youre taking the time to open up a dialogue. Also, when you have a positive relationship with the parents it makes it much easier to make the dreaded phone call if their child does something they shouldnt have. The parents wil be more receptive and less defensive if they know youre intentions are good.
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Nkmedina

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Reply with quote  #47 
It’s important to get to know the families and talk daily about how the children are doing. Making sure the families know you are open to conversaré and more than willing to help give the children what they need and the encouragement then also need.
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rjfranklin23

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Reply with quote  #48 
It's important to make sure that all families receive proper education and resources through their community and the school in order to raise their child. As a classroom teacher, I would make sure that all families felt valued and welcomed in the classroom by getting to know each family and including diverse materials in the classroom. It's also important to find ways to give parents praise when I see them doing something positive, no matter how small. 
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ehughes

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Reply with quote  #49 
One of the best ways to encourage family interaction is to communicate what is being taught and ways parents can reinforce the skills. It is also important to invite the parents to the classroom and encourage outside participation for skills. Communication is key to success with children and parent involvement/growth.
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devfreim

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Reply with quote  #50 
Communication is the best way to help families feel supported. They want to know what we're doing in class, and the student doesn't always have the ability or interest to communicate what we're doing in class. Talking with family members during pick-up and dropoff is the best way I have found to help them engage with their child's learning. Talking with family members also helps me get a more holistic picture of the student's home life, making it even more essential to get a the full picture of how best to help a student. 
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katarina.astley

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Reply with quote  #51 
How can you make sure all families receive encouragement in supporting the development of their children?

I think the best ways to make sure families receive encouragement would be through daily communication about how the children are each day that they arrive at the center, communication about the children's progress at the center, what they're learning about, and through providing resources for the families to look at or contact if the center staff notice the children seem to be struggling. All of these promote a positive relationship with the families and make them feel supported and feel like the staff members are there for their children and themselves. 
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susanalexis

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Reply with quote  #52 
I also believe that communication is the best key to make sure all families receive encouragement in supporting the development of their children.  However, it may not always be that simple.  Sometimes the caregiver/teacher do not see eye to eye with the parent.  Sometimes the parents speak a different language. And sometimes, the parents are so busy trying to provide for their families and stay afloat that they don't have much more they can give.  Unfortunately, that leaves the caregiver in a situation where he may need to give more attention to some children than others.  As long as the intent is to overall provide the same level of care and supplement the support given at home, I think that may be the best we can do at times.
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kpayo418

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Reply with quote  #53 
Communication! I live for communication! Get to know the parents, get to know the siblings who come in to pick up their siblings in your classroom. Show your interest in them and their family. There's definitely a boundary teachers should not pass, and it's up to us to figure that out because each family is uniquely different. Don't overreact over one occasion when a child shows some sort of change in behavior. Encourage the children as well as the parents!
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peteintro71

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Reply with quote  #54 
A child’s first teacher is their family. Keeping that connection of learning going once a child begins to attend school depends on communication. That communication can take many forms. Daily updates, conferences, class room visits, 1 on 1 talks to group discussions, learning stories, and simple picture snapshots of their child exploring the world of that classroom. Need to reach out to each family in a way that best works for them. This diverse dialogue between families and teachers builds a relationship of encouragement and collaboration between all a child’s “teachers” which ultimately supports the development of the child.
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lilafaria191

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Reply with quote  #55 
I read two children's books:

"I Can Lick 30 Tigers Today" by Dr. Seuss and
"The Pigeon Needs a Bath" by Mo Willems

The children seemed to enjoy the absurdity of both, and laughed especially loudly when I added special voices or dramatic effect to the reading.
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SelenaGreen86

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Reply with quote  #56 
There are many components, active listening, engaged responses, and open mindedness.  If one party is closed off in an argument, they will not come to a productive resolution.  Active listening is the art of listening to understand, not respond, and many people do not have this ability. There is also a physical reaction that needs to be demonstrated.  If one stands with arms crossed, an angry face, then they are demonstrating that they are not open to effective communication. Showing the parents of our students that we are supportive of their relationship with the child, by positive body language and active listening, they will recognize that they are the first teachers for their children and n return support the teacher student relationship as well.
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delgado_18

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Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #57 
Communicating with the parents is very important especially in the development of their child. For instance everyday when the parents pick up their child we share with them something that their child did or learned that day. With this information we explain to them how or what we did with their child. Giving this information we encourage the parents to try the activities at home with their child, especially if the child seemed to be very excited about the activity. Also, trying to learn different techniques that families use at home with their little ones also helps the teachers connect with their child in things they enjoy. 
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